Tag Archives: Fiction


Josh Mitteldorf, CRACKING THE AGING CODE & Aaron Thiel, MR. ETERNITY


Is aging inevitable? And if so, why? We talk with Josh Mitteldorf talks about his book, co-authored with Dorion Sagan, Cracking The Aging Code (Macmillan, 2016.) It’s about why we age and what we can do to slow aging down. Then, in keeping with our theme, we explore a novel about a man who never dies. We talk with Aaron Thier about his new work of fiction, Mr. Eternity. Continue reading


Jacqueline Woodson, ANOTHER BROOKLYN & Deborah Levy HOT MILK


Award-winning author Jacqueline Woodson talks about her novel Another Brooklyn. It’s in the form of a coming-of age memoir set in an African-American neighborhood in Brooklyn in the 1970’s. Then a novel about a mother-daughter relationship, dependence and getting free: Deborah Levy talks about Hot Milk. It was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize this year. Continue reading


Russell Banks: Voyager & Lost Memory of Skin

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We spend the hour with acclaimed author Russell Banks, first talking about his new book, Voyager, a travel and personal memoir. Then we re-air our 2011 interview with him about his novel Lost Memory of Skin.

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Kermit Roosevelt, ALLEGIANCE & Pamela Rotner Sakamoto (encore)


Kermit Roosevelt talks about his novel Allegiance, a legal thriller that has the internal debate over the policy of internment of Japanese Americans at its core. Then we re-air our interview with Pamela Rotner Sakamoto about her book, Midnight in Broad Daylight. It’s the true story of a Japanese-American family sundered by World War II on both sides of the Pacific. One side suffered internment. The other side of the family were there when the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Continue reading


Charlotte Rogan, Now And Again & Monique Morris, Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools


Charlotte Rogan talks about her new novel, Now And Again. It’s about an ordinary woman who becomes inspired to take on the fight against the social ills she sees around her — and what that means for the people she loves.

Then, Monique Morris talks about her groundbreaking book Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools.

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What Happens When Your Land Gets Fracked?


Novelist Jennifer Haigh talks about her powerful new book, Heat and Light. It’s about what happens to a small Pennsylvania community when the frackers come to town.

Then Andrew Nikiforuk tells the true story of Jessica Ernst, a Canadian oil patch consultant turned anti-fracking activist. We talk with him about his book, Slick Water: Fracking and One Insider’s Stand Against the World’s Most Powerful IndustryContinue reading


Ellen Meeropol: On Hurricane Island & Cecelia Tichi: Jack London


Ellen Meeropol talks about her new novel, On Hurricane Island. It’s about what happens when an innocent American citizen is abducted to a domestic black site and tortured. Meeropol also discusses how being married to one of the sons of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg has influenced her writing.

Then, a look back at one of the greatest writers and critics of America’s first Gilded Age and his relevance for today, Jack London: Cecelia Tichi talks about her biography of the great writer and democratic socialist, Jack London: A Writer’s Fight For a Better America.
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Katy Simpson Smith, Mary Costello & Poet Amy Dryansky


Katy Simpson Smith talks about her new novel, Free Men. Then in the second half of the show, we replay our 2014 interview with Smith about her acclaimed first novel, Story of Land And Sea. Also, we review Academy Street by Mary Costello and hear two poems by Amy Dryansky. Continue reading


Cicero’s End, Dust Up over Sanders’ Plan, & Remembering Quentin Young


We talk with novelist Robert Harris about the last book in his trilogy about the Roman statesman Cicero, Dictator. Then, economist James Galbraith tells us why he disagrees with the attacks on Gerald Friedman’s analysis of Senator Bernie Sanders’ economic plan. And finally, we pay tribute to Dr.Quentin Young, who passed away this week, with a clip from an interview Francesca did with him in 2009. Continue reading


Elizabeth George, A Banquet Of Consequences & Kenneth Wishnia, Jewish Noir


Acclaimed crime novelist Elizabeth George talks about her latest Inspector Lynley novel, A Banquet of Consequences. And then, just in time for Hanukkah, a new noir collection of short stories — Jewish Noir. edited by mystery writer Kenneth Wishnia. Continue reading


Two Allegories: Michael Golding’s A Poet of the Invisible World & Robin Cook’s Host


Michael Golding talks about A Poet of the Invisible World, his stunning new novel set in 13th century Persia. This fable explores the spiritual path taken by its main character, a Sufi poet with four ears.

Then, Robin Cook tells us about his new medical thriller, Host. It’s about what happens when medical research into the newest class of drugs — biologics — intersects with a greed-driven medical system. Continue reading


Marcel Theroux, STRANGE BODIES & Jessica Abel, OUT ON THE WIRE


Marcel Theroux talks about his new novel Strange Bodies. It’s a fantastic multi-genre romp — part sci-fi, part thriller, part disquisition on literary immortality. And then we pivot to the renaissance in radio storytelling, talking with cartoonist Jessica Abel about her graphic book, Out On The Wire: The Storytelling Secrets of the New Masters of Radio.

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Refugees of War: Lou Ureneck, THE GREAT FIRE & Lissa Evans, CROOKED HEART


Lou Ureneck talks about his book, The Great Fire. It tells the story of the burning of Smyrna by the Turks and the rescue of thousands of civilians by an American. We also talk with British novelist Lissa Evans about her dark comedy Crooked Heart, set in wartime London. It’s about a young refugee from the Blitz and his rescuer, a small time con artist. Continue reading


Sci-fi Imagines Climate Change: Paolo Bacigalupi’s THE WATER KNIFE & SHIPBREAKER


Paolo Bacigalupi talks about his new thriller, The Water Knife. It’s about the fight over water supplies in the American Southwest that erupts when a climate-driven mega-drought hits the region.

Then, we re-air portions of our 2011 interview with Bacigalupi about his sci fi novel for young adults, Shipbreaker. Also set in the climate-changed world of the near future, it takes place in Florida in a time of sea level rise. Continue reading