Yearly Archives: 2011

Podcast

Tahmima Anam: The Good Muslim & A Golden Age

Tahmima Anam

Novelist Tahmima Anam discusses her novels of Bangla Desh. In 2008, WV spoke with Anam about her acclaimed debut novel A GOLDEN AGE. It was about one family’s experience in the Bangla Desh struggle for independence from Pakistan. Now she’s back with a terrific sequel: it’s called THE GOOD MUSLIM. WV airs our interviews about both books today. And host Francesca Rheannon reads two poems of the Bengali writer, Rabindranath Tagore.

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Podcast

Susan Freinkel, PLASTIC & Dan Ferber CHANGING PLANET, CHANGING HEALTH

 

Susan Freinkel

 

Dan Ferber

Susan Freinkel talks about her fascinating exploration into our plastic world, PLASTIC: A Toxic Love Story. And science journalist Dan Ferber discusses CHANGING PLANET, CHANGING HEALTH, the book he co-wrote with epidemiologist Dr. Paul Epstein. It’s about epidemics and other health effects of global warming.

Update on Dr. Paul Epstein: WV regrets to announce the passing of Dr. Paul Epstein. He was a guide and mover in the world of public health. He will be missed.

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Podcast

Teju Cole, OPEN CITY & Max Page, THE CITY’S END

Teju Cole

On the 10th anniversary of 9/11, Teju Cole talks about his powerful and evocative novel, OPEN CITY and WV re-broadcasts a 2009 interview with Max Page about his book, THE CITY’S END: TWO CENTURIES OF FANTASIES, FEAR AND PREMONITIONS OF NEW YORK’S DESTRUCTION.

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Web Extras

Teju Cole on Art & Photography

Teju Cole

In addition to being a wonderful writer, Teju Cole is a photographer and a historian of early Netherlandish art, with an emphasis in Breughel.

Writers Voice host Francesca Rheannon talks with Cole about his perspective on photography and art in this Web-only excerpt from her interview with him.

 

 

Teju Cole black and white photography

Teju Cole color photography 

 

 

Podcast

Novelist Cathleen Schine & Climatologist James Hansen

Cathleen Schine

Novelist Cathleen Schine talks about her novel, THE THREE WEISMANNS OF WESTPORT. It’s a wickedly funny satire on the modern conventions of divorce — and more. And Dr. James Hansen talks about his book STORMS OF MY GRANDCHILDREN in a re-airing of a 2010 interview he gave WV.

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Podcast

Carl Safina, THE VIEW FROM LAZY POINT

Carl Safina
Harold Bloom

Carl Safina talks about THE VIEW FROM LAZY POINT: A Natural Year in an Unnatural World. And literary critic Harold Bloom confronts the end of life through the works of great poets. His book is TILL I END MY SONG: A Gathering of Last Poems.

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Podcast

Jessica Speart, WINGED OBSESSION, Hugh Raffles, INSECTOPEDIA & more

Jessica Speart
Hugh Raffles

Jessica Speart talks about WINGED OBSESSION: THE PURSUIT OF THE WORLD’S MOST NOTORIOUS BUTTERFLY SMUGGLER; Hugh Raffles talks about his award-winning book INSECTOPEDIA; and poet Patrick Donnelly tells WV about the poetry program at the Frost Place.

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Podcast

Green Home: Eric Corey Freed and Barry Katz

Eric Corey Freed
Barry Katz

Eric Corey Freed talks about the book he co-authored with Kevin Daum, GreenSense For The Home. And Barry Katz tells us about Practical Green Remodeling. Finally, green architect Betsy Pettit talks about the deep energy retrofit she did of her old house.
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Podcast

Caring for Elders: Susan Jacoby, NEVER SAY DIE & Allan Teel: ALONE & INVISIBLE NO MORE

Susan Jacoby
Dr. Allan Teel

Susan Jacoby talks about NEVER SAY DIE, her trenchant critique of the myth of the “new” old age. And Dr. Allan Teel explains his innovative, community-based approach to elder care; his book is ALONE AND INVISIBLE NO MORE.

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Web Extras

Dr. Allan Teel Tells a Story About His Dad

Our model of caring for the elderly is broken — miserable for seniors and unaffordable for society. But Dr. Allan Teel says he has the solution — commonsensical, cost-effective and a lot more humane. He explains it in his new book, Alone and Invisible No More: How Grassroots Community Action and 21st Century Technologies Can Empower Elders to Stay in Their Homes and Lead Healthier, Happier Lives.

Allan Teel has practiced geriatric and family medicine in Damariscotta, Maine for 25 years. He cares deeply about his patients and he respects them. So he chafed at the isolation, helplessness, and uselessness so many seniors experience in today’s nursing homes –- places that are little more than warehousing facilities. His frustration led him to developing an innovative approach that uses grassroots community action and 21st technologies to empower elders to stay in their homes — or return to them from the nursing home or assisted living. It’s called Full Circle America and he wants to roll it out across the country.

In this Web-only extra, Dr. Teel tells a story about his own elderly father, who took care of an even more frail elder when the man’s daughter needed a respite. It’s a great example of the Full Circle America approach.

Podcast

A Place Called Paradise: Brian Kitely, Marge Bruchac, Kerry Buckley

Brian Kitely
Marge Bruchac

Brian Kitely talks about his fascinating novel about Northampton, Massachusetts THE RIVER GODS. Historian Kerry Buckley talks about A PLACE CALLED PARADISE, the collection of essays about Northampton he edited. And Abenaki storyteller and researcher, Marge Bruchac gives a tour of “native Northampton.”

Brian Kitely
In the local parlance of western Massachusetts, the phrase “The River Gods” refers to the group of powerful men who held sway over the business and political life of the towns of the Connecticut River Valley region from the 17th and into the 18th century. Northampton was one of those towns and it’s the setting for my guest Brian Kitely’s novel, THE RIVER GODS.

Written in a series of short vignettes, the novel shifts back and forth in time to reveal glimpses of the town’s history, as well as the personal history of the author himself — often seen through his child’s eye. The reader meets the fiery preacher Jonathan Edwards, the husband of accused witch Goody Parsons, Sojourner Truth and other notable and unknown individuals from Northampton’s history.

One reviewer called it “a luminous, perfectly sculpted novel whose sentences flow as easily through the mind of a nine-year old boy in 1960s America as they do that of an 18th century Puritan divine.”

Brian Kitely teaches creative writing at the University of Denver. In addition to THE RIVER GODS, he is the author of two other novels, STILL LIFE WITH INSECTS and I KNOW MANY SONGS, BUT I CANNOT SING, as well as two books of writing exercises.

Read an excerpt from THE RIVER GODS

Marge Bruchac
A few years ago in the dead of winter, Abenaki storyteller and scholar Marge Bruchac took Francesca on a fascinating tour of what might be termed “native Northampton”: the places and traces where the native Algonquian tribes of the region made their home at the great bend of the Connecticut River where later the English colonists founded Northampton. The Indians called it, variously, Nonotuck or Norwottuck.

They first went to Fort Hill, the very place Brian Kitely lived as a child and that figures in his novel, THE RIVER GODS. Then they headed for Hospital Hill, where the state mental hospital used to be — and some of its imposing structures still stand — and where the Indians planted their fields of corn. Bruchac explains that the traces of native American life are to be found in the Yankee culture that succeeded it.

Marge Bruchac is the co-author of the book 1621: A New Look at Thanksgiving, published in 2001. She also contributed a chapter to a marvelous collection of historical essays about Northampton that were gathered into the book edited by the following guest, Kerry Buckley.

Kerry Buckley
A PLACE CALLED PARADISE came out in 2004, the year the town celebrated its 350th anniversary. I spoke that year with the book’s editor, Kerry Buckley. He’s the executive director of Historic Northampton, a museum of regional history and culture from the contact period to the present. It’s a collection of essays about the history of Northampton, MA, from the time of native peoples lived here and called it Norwottuck to the 20th century.

Website of Historic Northampton

Podcast

Jennifer Haigh, FAITH & Kristen Neff, SELF-COMPASSION

Jennifer Haigh
Kristin Neff

Novelist Jennifer Haigh talks about her terrific new novel, FAITH. Then Dr. Kristin Neff discusses her book, SELF-COMPASSION: Stop Beating Yourself Up and Leave Insecurity Behind. Finally, a review of Siri Hustvedt’s THE SUMMER WITHOUT MEN.

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Podcast

Three Writers on Nature: Elizabeth Tova Bailey, David Gessner & Carl Safina

Elizabeth Tova Bailey & friend

Elizabeth Tova Bailey talks about her beautifully written and poignant book, THE SOUND OF A WILD SNAIL EATING. It’s a memoir of a year spent closely observing a snail by her bedside while she lay bed-ridden during a severe illness. We also hear Francesca’s 2007 interview with David Gessner about his book, SOARING WITH FIDEL. It’s about his month’s long observation of a somewhat swifter creature than a snail — an osprey. Then Carl Safina reads from his acclaimed book, THE VIEW FROM LAZY POINT and poet Richard Wilbur reads his poem, “A Barred Owl.”

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